Ovid
The Art of Love
My high school Latin teacher (God bless you Ray Garza!)
forced me to memorize part of this work -- which later
allowed me to dazzle a Latin scholar at Oxford University in
a strange, once-in-a-lifetime anecdote that I will not share
here.  Alas, it is the only Latin poetry I know by heart . . .  
but it made me look like classicist for that one shining
moment.

Ferreus adsiduo consumitur anulus usu,
interit adsidua vomer aduncus humo.
Quid magis est saxo durum, quid mollius unda?
dura tamen molli saxa cavantur aqua

What is harder than a rock?  What is softer than water?  Yet
with constant application, water wears away the hardest
rock.

Of course, the question remains . . . Why did my high school
Latin teacher require his students to learn Ovid's advice on the
value of persistence in the arts of seduction?   

And they say learning Latin does not confer any practical
skills . . .


WEB RESOURCES

Here is an on-line translation with facing Latin text.

Salvador Dali's illustrations to Ovid's classic can be found
here.  
TIPS FOR READERS

Of course, I would
insist on the
Loeb
edition with facing Latin
text -- allowing me to
find my favorite passage
in the original.  But
most folks will chose
the
Michie or Green
versions.



A MODERN TWIST . . .

Only the name is  
(almost the) same, but
Erich Fromm's
Art of Loving
is an intriguing,
sometimes maddening
work.  But I suggest
you forget about the
psychologists when
trying to probe the
meaning of love.  My
favorite  studies of the
subject are
Ortega y
Gasset's brilliant On
Love
and
Stendhal's Love.